New Orleans Grillades

Donna Graffagnino


My mother-in-law used to make this but I didn't know the name of it and I didn't get the recipe before she passed away. I spent years trying to duplicate her recipe for my husband, based on his memory, and I finally realized that it was Grillades.
Pronounced GREE-ahds, this is THE quintessential New Orleans brunch dish served in restaurants, private homes, and by caterers all over the region. No longer just for brunch Grillades can be enjoyed for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
This is my version of New Orleans Chef John Besh's recipe.

pinch tips: How to Use a Meat Thermometer





1 Hr


1 Hr 30 Min


Stove Top



1 Tbsp
1/2 - 1 tsp
cayenne, depending on your taste preference
1 tsp
black pepper, coarsely ground
1 tsp
garlic powder
1 tsp
onion powder
2 tsp


4 lb
boneless beef or veal round steak, about 1/2" thick (don't use cubed or tenderized round steak)
1/2 c
all purpose flour
1/3 c
vegetable oil
1 Tbsp
bacon grease
2 medium
onions, chopped fine or sliced thin
2 medium
green or red bell peppers, chopped fine
3 stalk(s)
celery, chopped fine
3 clove
garlic, minced
2 c
san marzano whole tomatoes, crushed with juice
2 c
beef broth
1/2 c
red wine
bay leaf
1 Tbsp
worcestershire sauce, lea & perrin's
2 tsp
dried basil
1/2 tsp
dried oregano
1/4 tsp
crushed red pepper flakes (or more to taste)
salt & coarsely ground black pepper to taste
1/2 c
green onions, thinly sliced
1/3 c
fresh parsley, chopped

Directions Step-By-Step

Don't let the list of ingredients scare you. New Orleans cooking is bold and full of different flavors. This is an easy dish, just do your prep work ahead of time and have the ingredients at hand before you start.
In a small bowl combine the first 6 ingredients and set aside. Remove any fat from the beef or veal. Don't use cubed or pre-tenderized round, it's not the same.
Lay meat on a cutting board and sprinkle one side liberally with the seasoning blend, then sprinkle with flour.
Put plastic wrap on top and bottom of the meat and pound the meat until slightly flattened using a meat mallet. Flip the meat over and repeat the process with seasonings and flour. Pound to 1/8" - 1/4" thick.
Cut meat into 3 inch squares or pieces.

In a large heavy pot heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the meat, several pieces at a time and brown evenly on both sides. As the meat cooks transfer it to a plate and set aside.
Add about 2 tablespoons of flour to the pan, or enough to absorb remaining oil, stir until there are no lumps remaining and cook on medium-low heat until roux begins to turn the color of peanut butter.
To the roux add the onions and cook stirring frequently until the vegetables are soft and onions are caramelized, about 10 minutes. (The roux will seize up when the onions are added, it's supposed to do this.)

Add bell peppers, celery and garlic; cook another 5 minutes.
Add the tomatoes and their liquid and reduce the heat to medium-low. Add the broth, wine, bay leaves, oregano and basil. Stir to mix and bring to a simmer uncovered.
Add meat back to the pan, cover and cook until the meat is very tender, stirring occasionally. For Veal - cook about 45 minutes; for beef round - cook about 1 1/2 hours or until fork tender. If the liquid begins to evaporate add more both.
Spoon over buttered or cheese grits, rice or noodles and garnish with parsley and green onions. Serve with a sunny side up egg on the side of the plate. C'est ci bon!
*Notes: Many people use round steak for this recipe, but veal is the traditional and most delicious meat to use. Some people like to put this over cheese grits, but well salted and buttered plain grits was the original way of making this dish. It's also delicious over pasta, rice, or day-old biscuits.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Beef
Main Ingredient: Beef
Regional Style: Cajun/Creole
Other Tags: For Kids, Healthy, Heirloom