Split Pea Soup

1
Marsha Gardner

By
@mrdick1950

My son called this "Sea Poop" when he was first learning to talk. He grew up eating soup and loves every kind there is. Made my job easy getting those veggies in.

Rating:

★★★★★ 1 vote

Comments:
Method:
Stove Top

Ingredients

  • 2 c
    green split peas
  • 2
    water
  • 1
    ham bone
  • 1 c
    diced celery
  • 1 c
    diced onion
  • 1 c
    diced carrot
  • 2 c
    diced potatoe
  • 1
    bay leaf
  • ·
    kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tsp
    dried thyme
  • 1 Tbsp
    parsley flakes
  • 1 tsp
    granulated garlic powder

How to Make Split Pea Soup

Step-by-Step

  1. Wash and sort peas; add water and bring to a boil; simmer 2 minutes. Cover and stand off heat for 1 hour.
  2. In a separate pot cover ham bone with water and simmer with bay leaf, thyme, garlic and onion until tender. Remove bone and pull off meat.
  3. Add remaining vegetables to ham broth along with peas. Add meat and simmer until tender and desired thickness. Adjust seasonings. Enjoy your "Sea Poop"!

Printable Recipe Card

About Split Pea Soup

Course/Dish: Bean Soups
Main Ingredient: Beans/Legumes
Regional Style: American
Other Tag: Healthy




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