Split Pea and Ham Soup

1
Beverley Williams

By
@Beverley1991

This one of my favorite comfort foods. It is great on those cool fall and winter days.

Rating:

☆☆☆☆☆ 0 votes

Comments:
Serves:
6
Prep:
20 Min
Cook:
2 Hr 45 Min
Method:
Stove Top

Ingredients

  • 8 c
    water
  • 4 c
    smoked ham, cubed
  • 1 lb
    dried split peas
  • 1 medium
    onion, chopped
  • 1 tsp
    salt
  • 1/2 tsp
    pepper
  • 2 medium
    carrots, peeled and cut in 1/2 inch pieces
  • 1 stalk(s)
    celery, diced
  • 1/2 tsp
    thyme, dried
  • 1/8 tsp
    garlic powder

How to Make Split Pea and Ham Soup

Step-by-Step

  1. Place water and peas in a Dutch oven. Bring to a boil. Cook for 2 minutes.
  2. Remove from heat. Cover and let stand 1 hour.
  3. Stir in ham, onion, salt and pepper into peas.
  4. Heat to boiling. Reduce heat.
  5. Cover and simmer until peas are tender about 1 hour.
  6. Skim fat off the top if necessary.
  7. Stir in carrots, celery, garlic powder and thyme. Bring to a boil again. Then reduce heat.
  8. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally until carrots and celery are tender. About 45 minutes.

Printable Recipe Card

About Split Pea and Ham Soup

Course/Dish: Bean Soups
Main Ingredient: Vegetable
Regional Style: German




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