Pepper Jelly

Russ Myers


Please note how "dark green" one batch is. I asked my wife to add the food coloring for me, while I was stirring, she dumped in half a bottle instead of 4 drops.
We both laughed as she was saying opps.
The taste was not affected but the color is almost black.
Other than that, this is a recipe many shun thinking it's going to be red hot to taste, however, it's not hot at all. Just colorful and deliciously sweet.
Traditionally this jelly is served spooned over crackers and cream cheese or even ice cream.
Makes a wonderful Christmas gift.

pinch tips: Perfect Bacon Every Time



6 (half pint) jars


10 Min


10 Min




1 c
chopped green bell pepper
1/2 c
chopped fresh hot green pepper, such as jalapeno or serrano
1 1/2 c
apple cider vinegar
6 c
granulated sugar
4 oz
pectin (recommended: certo)
drops, red or green food coloring

Directions Step-By-Step

Process bell pepper and hot pepper in a food processor until finely minced.
Combine pepper mixture, vinegar, and sugar in a saucepan and bring to a rolling boil, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and add pectin and food coloring, stirring constantly
Return to full rolling boil for one (1) minute, again, stirring constantly
Pour into sterilized jars and seal (hot water bath for 10 minutes)*.
*Note: Follow USDA guidelines for proper sterilization and canning procedures.


Properly handled sterilized equipment will keep canned foods in good condition for years. Sterilizing jars is the first step of preserving foods.


Jars should be made from glass and free of any chips or cracks. Preserving or canning jars are topped with a glass, plastic or metal lid, which has a rubber seal. Two-piece lids are best for canning, as they vacuum-seal when processed.

To sterilize jars before filling with jams, pickles or preserves, wash jars and lids with hot, soapy water. Rinse well and arrange jars and lids open sides up, without touching, on a tray. Boil the jars and lids in a large saucepan, covered with water, for 15 minutes.

Use tongs when handling hot sterilized jars, to move them from boiling water. Be sure tongs are sterilized too, by dipping the ends in boiling water for a few minutes.

As a rule, hot preserves go into hot jars and cold preserves go into cold jars. All items used in the process of making jams, jellies and preserves must be clean. This includes any towels used, and especially your hands.

After the jars are sterilized, you can preserve the food. It is important to follow any canning and processing instructions included in the recipe and refer to USDA guidelines about the sterilization of canned products.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Jams & Jellies
Main Ingredient: Vegetable
Regional Style: American
Other Tag: Quick & Easy