Pawpaw Puree

Kathie Carr


Pawpaws grew wild on my parent's Indiana farm (In fact, I'm sure they still do). As kids we learned to eat them right off the tree in the fall and enjoyed their unique flavor. Be sure they are ripe before trying them or you will be disappointed.

This is a basic recipe for making puree which can be used in cooking and can be frozen for year round use.

I am also posting a recipe or two for using the puree. If you have pawpaws growing locally you might like to try using them. Pawpaw puree can be substituted for mashed bananas in any muffin, bread, pie, or cookie recipe you might like to use

pinch tips: How to Remove a Yolk





15 Min


several ripe pawpaws

Directions Step-By-Step

Check a pawpaws ripeness by squeezing gently, as you would a peach. The flesh should be soft, and the fruit should have a strong, pleasant aroma. The skin color of ripe fruit on the tree ranges from green to yellow, and dark flecks may appear, as on bananas.

Ripe pawpaws last only a few days at room temperature, but may be kept for a week in the refrigerator. Ripe pawpaw meat, with skin and seeds removed, can be pureed and frozen for later use.

Simply peel the pawpaw and place chunks of the fruit in a blender or food processor to puree.
The pawpaw is the largest fruit that you can eat that is native to the United States. Pawpaws grow in 26 states in the eastern U.S. Most are wild and grow in wooded areas.

They provide delicious and nutritious food. People usually eat them raw.
The flavor of the fruit is like a blend of tropical flavors, including banana, pineapple,
and mango. If you would like to try cooking with them pawpaws are a good substitute for bananas in almost any recipe.
Pawpaws are are high in vitamin C, magnesium, iron, copper, and manganese.
They are a good source of potassium and several essential amino acids, and they also contain significant amounts of riboflavin, niacin, calcium, phosphorus, and zinc.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Other Sauces