Photo of the Day

Hosted by Renée G.
Group active since Thu, Feb 07, 2019

The Photo of the Day features beautiful and stunning photos from around the world. This page is updated daily (well, almost daily) with a new photo. Sunsets, Sunrises, Landscapes, Flowers, Wildlife, and more interesting photos for you to enjoy.

Try to include the location of the photo if known but sometimes the photographers sharing these photos don’t include the location. And, always give credit to the photographer - I hope you enjoy seeing the photos that these photographers have shared.

Please feel free to share your photos here, whether your own or photos you might have come across on the Internet. Please post clear concise photos, sans watermarks. I've heard from several members that they look forward to seeing some of these fascinating locals from around the world.

Please reference interesting details concerning the photo for the better enjoyment of others.

And - there are groups on JaP for expressing political views, games, quizzes, and happenings; please keep them out of here and keep all your remarks to the concerns of the pictures.

Aside from these requests - please feel free to post pictures and comment away...Thank You!

NOTE - Any politically oriented post or comment will be removed immediately. This is a happy group and any bullying or attempts to do so, will not be tolerated.

sallye bates
2 hours ago

Awesome Sunset

Nature's beauty on display

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Renée G.
5 hours ago

Peachy Keen - Photo of the Day

A woman with a peach in Sochi, Russia. -Photo by Andrey Zvyagintsev.

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Rhonda O
20 hours ago

AUSTIN INDIANA

I did not know anything about this. I was a small child. It's amazing what history you can find out on the internet.
Do you remember this unique restaurant and filling station in Austin that served lunch and coffee to travelers? It opened in 1928 and was demolished in the 1960s. This photo was taken in the 1940s.

onlyinyourstate.com/...WagtAj82R7thg

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Renée G.
yesterday at 8:48 AM

Youngstown Revisited -Photo of the Day

An old barn around Youngstown, Ohio -Photo by Dick Pratt

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Joey Wolf
Tuesday at 10:32 PM

Gulfport, Illinois

Gulfport is a infamous little river town along the banks of the Mississippi River. It was famous for strip clubs, bars and Lord only knows what else back in the day! I have been hundreds of miles from home and someone would ask where I was from. I would tell them a little town on the Mississippi River, north of Burlington, IA and someone in the crowd would ask, ''Where's that from Gulfport?'' lol It was practically destroyed in 2008 when a section of it's levee gave way, putting 28 square miles of Henderson County under water for months! Route 34 runs along the south side of Gulfport, it was also shut down for months. This is the view of the Great River Bridge at Gulfport, IL, at 9:20 pm, July 6, 2020.

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sallye bates
Tuesday at 9:33 AM

Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana Causeway

See that little yellow stripe across the middle of the picture. That is 26 miles of causeway over water.

The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway is composed of two parallel bridges, each over 38 km long. One was completed in 1956 and the other, a slightly longer version, was completed in 1969. Since that year, it has been holding on to the title of ‘the world’s longest bridge over water’. In 2011, when a new bridge over Jiaozhou Bay in China threatened to rob Lake Pontchartrain Causeway of its coveted title, the Guinness World Records promptly created a new category to save USA from the embarrassment.
The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway was a monumental achievement for civil engineers, not only for its astonishing length, but also for the innovative techniques used in its construction. Prior to the Causeway's construction, the standard practice for bridge construction was to use solid square or circular concrete piles of 24-inches or less in diameter. The Causeway was the first bridge ever to be constructed using 54-inch in diameter hollow, cylindrical pre-stressed concrete piles that were larger and stronger than the norm, allowing fewer of them to be used and reducing costs.

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