Hearty Chicken Stock ala CIA

Andy Anderson !

By
@ThePretentiousWichitaChef

At the CIA, we made gallons and gallons of this excellent stock every day. It’s used in the five restaurants that are maintained by the New York Culinary Institute.

This recipe is simple, but it does require your attention; as a matter of fact, it takes about 4 hours to make this excellent stock, but in the end it’s well worth the wait.

If, after you make this stock, and take the next step and create a consommé by building a raft, you have a super flavorful liquid that will knock your socks off.

That’s right, your socks will actually be blown off your feet.


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Comments:

Serves:

6-8

Prep:

20 Min

Cook:

4 Hr

Method:

Stove Top

Ingredients

6-8 lb
chicken bones
6 qt
cold, filtered water
1 large
onion, finely chopped
1 1/2 stalk(s)
celery, finely chopped
1 medium
carrot, finely chopped
2 medium
bay leaves
2 sprig(s)
parsley
2 sprig(s)
thyme
8-10
black peppercorns, whole
1/2 tsp
table salt, or half that if kosher

Directions Step-By-Step

1
Thoroughly rinse the chicken bones, and combine them in a large stockpot, along with the water.

Chef's Note: If you have a butcher shop, close at hand you can probably get all the chicken bones you need.
2
Bring to a boil over low heat.
3
As the mixture comes to a boil, skim off the foam, and scum that rises to the surface. Continue to skim the surface on a regular basis, until the mixture comes to a boil.
4
Chef's Note: The skimming of the stock is very important, because it removes impurities that could adversely impact the flavor of the end product.
5
Turn the heat down, and simmer slowly for three hours. The stock should smell very fragrant.

Chef’s Note: Simmering is not boiling. In a simmer there are occasional bubbles breaking the surface, and very little movement in the pot.
6
Add all the veggies and continue to simmer for an additional hour.

Chef’s Note: You could tie all the veggies together in cheesecloth (called a: sachet´ d´epices); however, since you are going to strain the veggies out of the stock at the end, I don’t really see a need.
7
At the end of that final hour, strain the stock through a china cap, or other fine mesh strainer, lined with cheesecloth.

Press lightly on the solids to extract the liquid.
8
Chef’s Note: The biggest mistake in making a good stock is in leaving the veggies in over an hour. After an hour, the veggies have given up all they can to the stock, and overcooking them will release sulfuric compounds… I HATE it when that happens.
9
Chill in an ice bath, or overnight in the refrigerator, and then skim off any fat that accumulates on the surface.

And there you have it, excellent, well flavored chicken stock.
10
Chef's Note: You can brown the bones in the oven a bit before beginning the process to give the stock a richer flavor.
11
Stock Versus Broth

Stock: A strained liquid that results from simmering meats, fish, herbs, and vegetables in water. Used as a basis for soups or sauces.

Broth: A flavorful, aromatic liquid made by simmering water or stock with meat or vegetables. Usually, for only an hour.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Other Soups
Main Ingredient: Chicken
Regional Style: American
Hashtag: #stock