Corn - Freezing

Patricia J.


Mom got this recipe for preserving fresh corn from a friend when I was just a little girl. The friend's mother had passed it on to her. Mom estimates that the recipe is approximately 80-90 years old and the corn was probably canned before freezers came along. All I (and my family) know is that the corn tastes as fresh when I take it out of the freezer as when I put it in.

pinch tips: How to Wash Fruits & Vegetables




Yields: 4 quarts


Stove Top


4 qt
fresh corn
4 c
1 c
4 tsp
canning salt

Directions Step-By-Step

Shuck and silk corn.
Use a large dish pan or a 9x13-inch pan. Cut the kernels of corn off the cob (I have a mandolin and set it in the pan...makes it a whole lot easier). Using the blunt side of the knife, scrape the cob to get any remaining milk.
Put all ingredients in a large pan (I use my Dutch oven) and mix together.
Place pot on stove over medium heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.
Reduce heat and continue to cook (stirring occasionally to prevent corn from sticking or burning). Taste when you stir the corn...when the milk has set in the corn, turn off the burner and remove from heat. Watch this step, because once it starts boiling it will only take 3-4 minutes for the milk to set.
Cool completely (it is important to cool it completely and not just until it is lukewarm). I run one side of the sink full of cold water and set the pot in it. Stir occasionally and when the water gets warm drain it and replace with cold water. Continue to stir occasionally and change the water until the corn is completely cool.
Place 4 cups of corn in each freezer bag and freeze.
When ready to eat it (it's already been cooked) just thaw, put it in a pan with a stick of butter and heat through.
It really is very simple...the most tedious part is shucking and silking the corn. I have found that when I'm working with large amounts of corn (and cherries, beans, peas, etc.) that it's easiest to put a large plastic tablecloth on the floor and put everything, including me, on it. It contains the splatters and the rest of the kitchen stays clean. Set a couple of trash bags by you so you can discard the husks, silks and cobs as you go.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Vegetables
Main Ingredient: Vegetable
Regional Style: American
Other Tag: Heirloom