Homemade Horseradish

Terrie Hoelscher

By
@Blessed1

Horseradish is one of those things that can be either really popular, or very unpopular. I happen to love it, and eat it 'til the tears run down my face! A bit of really pungent horseradish will do wonders for your sinuses! Beware: a little bit will go a long way! Homemade horseradish can be much stronger than the store-bought kind, so be careful when making this. Work at arm's-length, protect your eyes, and ventilate the area well. This will last for about 3 - 5 weeks in your fridge.


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Comments:

Serves:

12

Prep:

15 Min

Ingredients

1
8-10" horseradish root [tuber]
2 Tbsp
water
1 Tbsp
white vinegar
1 pinch
salt

Directions Step-By-Step

1
Rinse the horseradish tuber; trim the ends, and peel it with a vegetable peeler, just as you would a carrot.
2
Chop into small cubes (1/2", or so) and put into a blender or a food processor. [you can also do this on the "fine" end of your grater, but make sure the area is well-ventilated, and protect your eyes from the aeration of the juices!!] If doing in a blender/food processor, add 2 Tbsp. water, and process on high, until it is well ground.
NOTE: Be very careful from this point on. It can be very harsh on your eyes. Ground, fresh horseradish is very pungent, much stronger than a fresh cut-up onion, and can burn! Work from an arm's-length away, and make sure it is a well-ventilated area.
3
Pour off some of the water if the mixture is too runny. Add a tablespoon of white vinegar and a pinch of salt to the mixture. Pulse a few more times to combine.
NOTE: the vinegar will sort of "put a stop" to the heat of the ground horseradish, so do not hesitate too long before adding it to the mixture. It stabilizes the ground horseradish.
4
After you have added the vinegar and let it sit for a few minutes, you might have a lot of liquid ... strain it out, for storage of the horseradish. [I use a coffee filter ... just line your colander w/ a coffee filter, pour in the horseradish & liquids, and let it sit for awhile. The watery part will strain thru the filter, leaving you with the ground-up horseradish.
5
Using a spatula, carefully transfer the ground horseradish to a small, glass jar with a secure fitting lid. This will store several weeks in your refrigerator.
This is fabulous on prime rib, steaks of all kinds, shrimp, pork, and even in some marinades and dipping sauces ... just use your imagination!

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Spreads