Home Made Orange Marmalade

Marcia McCance

By
@mmccance

I love orange marmalade and usually just get the store bought variety, but found this in Mom's recipes.

Mom did canning when we were small but we were not allowed in the kitchen. I've found some easy instructions in case you need them. Myself? I'd store half in the freezer and the other half in the fridge for daily use but that is just an idea. I've not tried it.

The rind of the citrus fruit has naturally occurring pectin, so no need to add any artificially.

I used to love to dip chicken nuggets in a mix of equal parts orange marmalade and spicy brown mustard -- mmmmmm, good times!


Featured Pinch Tips Video

Rating:

Comments:

Method:

Stove Top

Ingredients

4 medium
oranges (cut in half, then thinly sliced)
1 medium
grapefruit (juice and 1/2 of rind cut fine)
1 medium
lemon (juice only)
6-8 c
water
1 c
sugar for every cup of fruit, plus one extra

Directions Step-By-Step

1
Cut the oranges in half crosswise (from the stem through to the bottom), then into very thin half-moon slices -- Juice the lemon (discard the lemon rind)
2
Juice the grapefruit then take 1/2 of the rind and cut it up very fine. (The pith in the rind will act like pectin.)
3
Set the lemon and grapefruit juice aside.
4
Place the oranges and the grapefruit rind in a large stainless steel sauce pan with the 6-8 cups of water and boil until the fruit is tender.
5
Measure the amount of the fruit in the pan, and add one cup of sugar for every cup of fruit, then add one more. -- then boil this mixture until it starts to gel.
6
Once it has started to gel, then add the grapefruit and lemon juice and continue boiling until it gels to the consistency you are looking for (about 40 minutes)
7
You can test the consistency by placing a small spoonful in a cup and placing it in the freezer for a minute or two -- when it has cooled you can check to see if it is the consistency you are looking for.
8
My idea would be to let it cool slightly and separate it into the containers I will freeze it in -- leaving one in the fridge for use. Please note that I have not tried this method -- so use at your own risk!!
9
If you desire to "bottle" it, then here are the directions:
10
There are several ways to sterilize your jars for canning. You can run them through a short cycle on your dishwasher. You can place them in a large pot (12 quart) of water on top of a steaming rack (so they don't touch the bottom of the pan), and bring the water to a boil for 10 minutes. Or you can rinse out the jars, dry them, and place them, without lids, in a 200°F oven for 10 minutes.
11
As the time approaches for the marmalade to be done, boil some water in a tea pot. Put the jar lids in a glass or ceramic bowl and pour the boiling water over them to sterilize.
12
Once the jelly has reached 220-222°F (or 8-10°F over the boiling temperature of water at your altitude) remove the jelly pot from the heat. Carefully ladle the jelly into the jars, (or pour it from a pitcher) one at a time, leaving 1/4 inch head space at the top of the jars for a vacuum seal. Wipe the rim clean with a clean, wet paper towel. Place the lid on the jar, securing with a jar ring. Work quickly.
13
If you want, you can process the jars in a hot water bath for 5 minutes to help get a better seal and to help prevent mold. If you used boiling water in an earlier step to sterilize the jars, you can just keep the same set-up for the water bath. You want to make sure there is a rack at the bottom of the pot so that the jars aren't actually resting on the bottom of the pot.
14
Allow the jars to sit overnight. You will hear them make a popping sound as a vacuum seal is created.
15
I got the canning information from:
www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/seville_orange_marmalade/ -- Posted by Elise Bauer on February 25, 2006

About this Recipe

Main Ingredient: Fruit
Regional Style: American
Other Tag: Heirloom