Cake Baking Tips

Karla Everett


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Directions Step-By-Step

Make Bigger Cakes From Mixes: To make a bigger cake from a mix, add 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 tsp. baking powder.
Have a bag of chocolate chips on hand? Just sit the whole bag in a bowl of very hot water, and mush the bag up every couple of minutes until all the chocolate has melted and there are no lumps. Snip the corner of the bag and squeeze out the melted chocolate directly onto the cake.
To keep cake frosting from sticking to waxed paper, rub a small amount of butter over part of paper that covers the frosting.
To keep chocolate cakes brown on the outside, grease pans and dust with cocoa, instead of flour.
Try coating greased baking pans with sugar instead of flour. The sugar creates an even layer and won't leave a greasy, floury residue on cakes. Actually, it adds a lightly sweet, crunchy coating on the cake!
Do not grease for sponge, angel food or chiffon cakes. For other cakes grease the bottom of the pan only so that cakes will rise evenly.
Bake whole egg cake in a hotter oven (375°F.) than chocolate and white cake. Be careful to bake white cake at a low temperature. Too much heat toughens egg white. Bake chocolate cake in a moderate–not hot–oven.
Add a little flour before putting in any milk, then add flour and milk alternately. This keeps the first mixture from breaking down or “curdling” as it does when milk is added first.
Before measuring shortening or peanut butter for a recipe, swirl a raw egg in the cup first (use the egg in the recipe if one is called for). The egg coating inside the cup will cause the contents to come right out.
You can also use a long piece of unflavored dental floss and All you do is hold the floss tightly between two fingers and bear down with just a bit of pressure; the floss will slice cleanly through most soft cakes or pastries.
To cut a cake layer in half : Place toothpicks at the halfway point around the edges of the cake layer. If you're making a particularly spongy cake, it helps to make a few cuts with a serrated knife along the toothpick row, in order to give the floss something to bite into.
know that when the floss is fully wrapped around the cake, cross the ends of the floss and hold each end in each hand. pull each end out and away from the cake, so the floss cuts through the cake as the circle of floss tightens up.
Now you have 2 layers of cake.
Slide a piece of cardboard or a baking sheet (with no sides) between the 2 layers and lift off the top layer.
Dust the cake holder or platter with a bit of confectioner’s sugar before placing the freshly baked cake on it, this will help keep the cake from sticking to the bottom.
You can make your own cake flour if necessary, simply add two level tablespoons of corn starch to a one cup measuring cup, then fill with bread flour. Sift three times then use as needed.
Sizing it up ,

You've probably come across this problem -- we all have -- of not having the correct pan size called for in the recipe.
The rule of thumb -- for the best results -- is to always use the specified pan size, but in a pinch the following substitutions may be used:
If the recipe calls for one 8-by-4-by-2-inch loaf pan, substitute two 5 1/2-by-3 1/4-inch loaf pans. ******************
One 8-inch-square pan for one 9-inch-round cake pan.

If you don't have two 9-inch-round cake pans, substitute three 8-inch-round cake pans.
Substitute a 10-inch tube pan or two 9-by-5-by-3-inch loaf pans for a one 12-cup fluted tube pan.
Substitute two 9-inch-round cake pans for a 13-by-9-by-2-inch pan.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Other Non-Edibles
Other Tag: Quick & Easy
Hashtag: #tips