How To Make An Omelette

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In cuisine, an omelette or omelet is a dish made from beaten eggs quickly cooked with butter or oil in a frying pan, sometimes folded around a filling such as cheese, vegetables, meat (often ham), or some combination of the above. To obtain a fluffy texture, whole eggs or sometimes egg whites only are beaten with a small amount of milk or cream, or even water, the idea being to have "bubbles" of water vapor trapped within the rapidly cooked egg.

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2 Tbsp
1/8 tsp
dash of pepper
1 tsp
1/3 to 1/2 c
filling, such as shredded cheese, finely chopped ham, baby spinach

Directions Step-By-Step

Step 1

BEAT eggs, water, salt and pepper in small bowl until blended.

Step 2

HEAT butter in 7 to 10-inch nonstick omelet pan or skillet over medium-high heat until hot. TILT pan to coat bottom. POUR IN egg mixture. Mixture should set immediately at edges.

Step 3

GENTLY PUSH cooked portions from edges toward the center with inverted turner so that uncooked eggs can reach the hot pan surface. CONTINUE cooking, tilting pan and gently moving cooked portions as needed.

Step 4

When top surface of eggs is thickened and no visible liquid egg remains, PLACE filling on one side of the omelet. FOLD omelet in half with turner. With a quick flip of the wrist, turn pan and INVERT or SLIDE omelet onto plate. SERVE immediately.
Insider Information:
--Prepare filling first. Omelets cook so quickly, any fillings should be ready to go before starting the eggs. Plan on 1/3 to 1/2-cup filling per 2-egg omelet. Raw foods should be cooked. Refrigerated foods should be heated. Shredded cheese and room temperature foods, such as jams and jellies, are fine as is. Pieces should be small to prevent tearing the omelet when it's folded.

--Made-to-order: Omelets are best cooked one at a time and served immediately.

--For more servings, multiply the recipe as needed, preparing only as many eggs as you will use in a short time. Use 1/2 cup egg mixture per omelet.

--Omelet pans are shallow and have sloped sides – designed for ease of moving the omelet mixture during cooking and for sliding the finished omelet out. If you don't have an omelet pan, it's best to use a heavy skillet with sloping sides.

--For beginners: 1/3 to 1/2 cup filling for a 2-egg omelet can be difficult to manage at first. Try putting only half the filling inside the omelet. Spoon the rest across the top of the omelet after it's on the plate.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Eggs