Pullman Bread Pain De Mie

Deb Crane


I bought a pullman bread pan years ago. Pain De Mie in french.
I finally did a bit of research and made a loaf. This makes square shaped slices great for sandwiches. Way better then store bought bread! This makes a dense white bread that holds up well. Slice it after it has cooled, and keep it in the freezer taking out what is needed. This will keep for quite some time if frozen.
If you dont have this pan, you can use a regular bread pan or the bread machine.

pinch tips: How to Knead Dough



1 loaf




1 c
water (luke warm)
2 3/4 c
bread flour
2 Tbsp
dried milk
2 Tbsp
1 1/2 tsp
2 tsp
active dry yeast
2 Tbsp

Directions Step-By-Step

A found a little history about this bread pan;
The name "Pullman" was derived from its use in the compact kitchens of the Pullman railway cars. The Pullman Company is credited with inventing the lidded baking pans used to create the square loaves. Three Pullman loaves occupied the same space as two standard round-topped loaves, thus maximizing the use of space in the Pullman kitchen.
Also, in my research, I have found that you can make any white bread recipe you like. The trick with this pan, is using the right amount of dough. I found if you fill it about 1/3 of the pan, the loaf will bake up to the top and create a perfectly square loaf.
The recipe I share here, is a basic white loaf recipe. If you like, you can half the white flour and substitute whole wheat or other flour. Again, if you do have this pan, try other yeast bread recipes that you like. King Arthur Flour Company has a recipe for this bread. They include a bit of potato flour, which I didnt have, so I used my old stand by basic white bread this time.
Bread Machine Method: Place all of the ingredients into the pan of your machine, program the machine for Manual or Dough, and press Start. When the cycle is finished, remove the dough and proceed as follows.

Lightly grease a 13 x 4-inch pain de mie pan. Transfer the risen dough to a lightly greased work surface, shape it into a 13-inch log, and fit it into the pan. Cover the pan with lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the dough to rise until it's just below the lip of the pan, 45 minutes to 1 hour, depending on the warmth of your kitchen (it may rise even more slowly in a cool kitchen; don't worry, this long rise will give it great flavor).

Remove the plastic, and carefully place the cover on the pan, let it rest an additional 10 minutes while you preheat your oven to 350°F. Bake the bread for 25 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven, carefully remove the lid, and return the bread to the oven to bake for an additional 20 minutes, or until it tests done. Remove the bread from the oven, and turn it out of the pan onto a rack to cool completely.
Manual Method: In a large bowl, combine the milk, water, butter, salt and sugar. Add the dried milk, flours and yeast, stirring till the dough starts to leave the sides of the bowl. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased surface, oil your hands, and knead it for 5 to 8 minutes, or until it's smooth and supple. Because of the relatively high fat content of this dough, it's a real pleasure to work with. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl or dough-rising bucket, cover the bowl or bucket, and allow the dough to rise till puffy though not necessarily doubled in bulk, about 1 1/2 hours, depending on the warmth of your kitchen.
Mixer Method: Combine the ingredients as above, using a flat beater paddle or beaters, then switch to the dough hook(s) and knead for 5 to 8 minutes. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl,cover the bowl, and allow the dough to rise till doubled in bulk, 1 to 2 hours.

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Savory Breads, Other Breads
Main Ingredient: Flour
Regional Style: French