Homemade Cultured Buttermilk

Sue Bosbury

By
@banaltra

If you re-culture this regularly, you can carry on re-culturing indefinitely. This is so much better than adding lemon juice to milk to get the sour effect.


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Comments:

Serves:

12

Prep:

5 Min

Cook:

5 Min

Method:

Canning/Preserving

Ingredients

1/4 to 1/2 c
cultured buttermilk
1 to 2 qt
skim, 1%, 2% or whole milk from the store or whole milk

ALSO NEEDED:

1 CLEAN, DRY QUART OR HALF GALLON JAR WITH A TIGHT FITTING TWO PIECE LID

Directions Step-By-Step

1
Pour buttermilk (1/4 cup for a quart jar or ½ cup for a half gallon jar) into your clean jar. Top off the jar with your plain milk. Tightly screw lid to the jar and shake vigorously for 1 minute. Place in a warm (but not hot) area out of direct sunlight. Let it sit there for 12 to 24 hours, until thickened. Refrigerate when thick. Use within two weeks.
2
Buttermilk is used in recipes for several important reasons:

Buttermilk is acidic, so it helps invigorate leavening agents -such as baking powder, baking soda and yeast- when added to baked goods. The acid also helps combat discoloration in baked goods and promotes deep, beautiful browning.
Buttermilk contains natural emulsifiers; this improves texture and aroma, and extends shelf life after baking.
Remember how buttermilk is acidic? That makes it a wonderful addition to marinades for chicken and pork. The acid helps tenderize the meat and gives it a tangy flavor.
You know the ‘cultured’ part of cultured buttermilk? It’s good for you. It contains many active cultures similar to those found in yogurt. Most of the cultures generally found in buttermilk are form the Lactococcus Lactis family and many of their subspecies. Those cultures are what make buttermilk so thick and creamy. And what? Good for you!

About this Recipe

Course/Dish: Cheese Appetizers
Main Ingredient: Dairy
Regional Style: American